Goodwill

Top Ways You Can Support Your Local Goodwill

For over 115 years, Goodwill Industries has been helping individuals and families reach their full potential. The organization does this by investing profits from local Goodwill locations into various programs focused on employment, education, and skills training.

In 2017 alone, Goodwill helped connect over 288,000 people with employment in various industries, including information technology, banking, and healthcare. Additionally, more than 2.1 million people used Goodwill services for career advancement and financial guidance in 2017. Another 30,000 individuals turned to a local Goodwill organization for help in earning credentials such as training certificates and college degrees.

While Goodwill remains committed to its mission to strengthen communities, the nonprofit cannot accomplish its goals alone. The organization receives government grants as well as corporate and foundational support. However, it is most dependent on the donations and assistance it receives from individuals in communities across the country.

If you’re interested in joining those helping to advance Goodwill’s mission, you can do so in a number of ways. Here are some of the things you can do right now to get involved:

Donate Items to a Local Goodwill Organization

One of the easiest ways to support the nonprofit is by donating items that you and your family no longer need to a local Goodwill organization. Goodwill is happy to accept a wide range of items, including toys, clothing, books, home décor, electronics, and furniture.

Goodwill

Image courtesy Mike Mozart | Flickr

Before making your donation, it’s important to inspect the items to ensure that they are in working order and include any necessary parts. Also, while clothing and furniture certainly don’t need to be in perfect condition, items that are free of large rips, holes, and stains will likely do the most good. Goodwill also suggests that would-be donors contact their local organization before donating items such as computers, vehicles, and mattresses to see if there are any rules concerning these types of donations.

To find the nearest Goodwill, donors can visit the organization’s website and use the locator tool at the top of the homepage. Those who are unable to visit a location in person may be able to request a donation pickup. A simple phone call can help you find out if pickup service is available in your area.

Goodwill also maintains donation bins, which are a convenient option for many people. However, the organization recommends that donors inspect bins before dropping off any items to ensure that they are maintained by Goodwill rather than a for-profit group.

Volunteer Your Time or Contribute Financially

If you’re looking to give back to your community, volunteering at a local Goodwill is a great way to do just that. The organization offers opportunities for people to volunteer online or in person.

Professionals can assist people interested in entering their career field by working as a virtual career mentor for GoodProspects. This online community assists jobseekers and those looking to grow in their profession.

Goodwill also oversees a national youth mentoring program, GoodGuides. This program provides guidance and support to help at-risk youth 12 to 17 years of age make positive decisions. GoodGuides welcomes both peer and adult mentors who can devote one hour a week to the program.

Along with volunteering, you can support Goodwill by making a one-time or recurring cash donation online, by phone, or via traditional mail. Goodwill gratefully accepts donations of all sizes and gives donors the option of directing their funds to a local organization or its national programs and activities.

In addition to accepting direct financial contributions, Goodwill oversees a planned giving program for those who would like to include Goodwill in their wills or declare the organization a beneficiary of their retirement plan. More information about the program and how your donations are put to good use is available at www.goodwill.org/give.

Work as a Goodwill Advocate

Through its Advocacy Action Center, Goodwill Industries advances public policy that supports job training and employee placement programs in local communities. Currently, Goodwill is working to promote and advance key human services issues to help older workers, individuals with criminal backgrounds, and veterans overcome barriers to gainful employment. The organization also advocates for the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program and employment opportunities for young people.

In addition to its activities in the areas of workforce development and job creation, Goodwill Industries works with members of Congress and other key decision makers to protect charitable giving incentives and develop legislation regarding the disposal of electronic waste. Moreover, the organization protects employer priorities as an advocate for the AbilityOne program. AbilityOne provides employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities or visual impairment.

Those interested in getting involved can join the efforts by registering as an advocate online to receive updates about the organization’s latest advocacy activities. Goodwill advocates can also reach out to their local elected officials and political candidates to share why it’s important to protect opportunities for working families.

Featured Image courtesy Mike Mozart | Flickr

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blood-pressure

Inspiring People to Save Lives at the American Heart Association

AHAlogoThe American Heart Association (AHA) reaches communities across the nation and around the world through its range of programs focused on cardiovascular care, research, and education. For health care professionals, the organization publishes several scientific journals and oversees strategically focused research networks to promote and advance the latest science in heart disease prevention and treatment. Additionally, the group provides emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) training for health care providers, caregivers, and members of the public.

The AHA has been a global leader in ECC science, education, and training since the early 1960s, when cardiovascular pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was first developed. Today, the Association publishes the official CPR and ECC guidelines and trains 23 million people annually in how to respond to cardiac arrest and first-aid emergencies. In addition to online courses and resources, the AHA provides CPR and ECC training through a network of more than 30,000 instructors and training centers around the globe.

Here’s a closer look at how the organization and its emergency care programs are inspiring people to save lives worldwide:

Preparing the Public for Health Emergencies

Anyone interested in learning basic or advanced lifesaving skills can turn to the AHA for a variety of virtual and in-person training programs in first aid, CPR, and the use of automatic external defibrillators. One of the organization’s most convenient training options is CPR Anytime, which includes portable training kits and self-directed learning to teach the basics of infant, child, and adult CPR and choking relief in as few as 20 minutes. CPR Anytime kits and learning materials are available through the AHA website.

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The AHA also offers more in-depth training through programs featuring a combination of online and in-person courses. At AHA training centers nationwide, professional instructors teach the Family & Friends CPR course to people who want to learn CPR but are not required to do so for their jobs. Those who do require a CPR course completion card as part of a job requirement can complete one or more of the AHA’s five Heartsaver courses, which the organization offers at its training centers and on-site at company locations. All of the AHA’s public training courses and programs are hands-on and follow the organization’s research-proven practice-while-watching training technique.

 

Enhancing the Knowledge and Skills of Health Care Professionals

After completing their initial medical training, physicians, nurses, emergency medical technicians, and other health care professionals rely on the AHA to stay current with the latest emergency-response techniques. Along with its Basic Life Support course, the organization offers its Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support course for professionals looking to enhance their skills in responding to cardiopulmonary emergencies in a health care setting. The AHA’s other professional training offerings include the Pediatric Advanced Life Support course, which focuses on emergency treatment of infants, children, and adolescents.

As with its training programs for the general public, the AHA offers different options for the delivery of its professional courses. Health care providers can complete the programs in a classroom under the guidance of an instructor or through blended learning activities that combine online training with in-person skills sessions. The AHA delivers its blended courses through HeartCode, a self-directed eLearning program that uses lifelike animations and eSimulation technology to prepare students for real resuscitation events.

 

Providing Workforce Training and CPR in Schools

For a number of years, the AHA has worked in partnership with the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to promote workplace safety and advance programs that support workers’ health and well-being. As part of these efforts, the Association delivers workplace training programs in pediatric and adult first aid and CPR. The AHA also offers training focused on blood-borne pathogens and provides resources to help business leaders develop and maintain AED programs in their companies. In addition to their use in construction and manufacturing, AHA’s workplace training programs are widely implemented across the oil and gas, security, and childcare industries.

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Beyond the workplace, students and educators across the country use the AHA’s CPR in Schools Training Kit to learn and practice cardiac resuscitation techniques. The reusable kits contain inflatable manikins, training DVDs, and instructional materials that can be used to teach CPR skills to up to 20 people within a single class period. The AHA also offers additional resources to help teachers and administrators start and sustain CPR and AED training programs in schools nationwide.

 

Highlighting the Importance of Emergency Preparedness

Each year, the AHA, American Red Cross, National Safety Council, and other organizations celebrate National CPR and AED Awareness Week during the first week in June. Established in 2007, the national awareness event highlights how many lives could be saved if more people knew how to perform CPR and use an AED. The week also raises awareness of how important it is for bystanders to respond to emergencies involving cardiac arrest. To promote National CPR and AED Awareness Week, the AHA offers a variety of materials, including posters, fact sheets, and email templates, on its website at www.cpr.heart.org.

 

Disclaimer: This website contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. This information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy or validity of any statements or information provided on this website. Do not rely on this information as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or another professional healthcare provider. You should seek immediate medical attention if you think you are suffering from a medical condition. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website.

woman

Go Red For Women – What You Need to Know

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For nearly a century, the American Heart Association (AHA) has been fighting heart disease and stroke by funding innovative research and providing critical tools and information to help people take control of their heart health. The AHA’s work since 1924 has led to research investments exceeding $4 billion. The Association has also established various public programs supported by a nationwide network of more than 3,400 employees and 30 million volunteers.

In the early 2000s, the AHA began expanding its efforts to raise awareness about women’s health and cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death among women in the United States. Much of the AHA’s work in this area is driven by Go Red For Women, a health-based awareness initiative now in its second decade. Read on to learn more about the initiative and how it empowers women to lead healthier lives.

Addressing a Serious Threat to Women’s Health

When the American Heart Association launched Go Red For Women in 2004, more than a half million American women were dying from cardiovascular disease each year. Despite its impact on female health, however, many people still viewed heart disease as a problem that only men and older adults had to worry about. For many years, this erroneous view of heart disease and risk was further propagated by researchers who made men the subject of the heart disease studies that informed early treatment guidelines and programs.

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Although public awareness of heart disease among women has improved, a significant knowledge gap still exists. In fact, nearly half of all women are unaware that heart disease is their gender’s leading cause of death. Even more women lack basic knowledge of how risk factors such as cholesterol and blood pressure affect their heart health. While many women are taking steps to get healthier, their unawareness of their risk of heart disease persists.

How Does Go Red For Women Help?

With approximately one woman dying from heart disease every minute, Go Red For Women’s main goal is to save lives. As part of the initiative, the AHA provides information on a variety of heart-related topics at GoRedforWomen.org. Visitors to the website can explore sections covering congenital heart defects, atherosclerosis, and heart disease prevention. The site also lists heart disease myths and statistics and includes links to educational tools and resources that women can use to live heart healthy.

In addition to educating women through its website, the Go Red For Women initiative provides continuing medical education to help healthcare providers improve heart health among their female patients. Funds raised through the initiative also support heart disease research and community programs such as the Go Red Heart CheckUp, which has educated more than 2 million women nationwide about their heart disease risk. Through these and other activities, Go Red For Women supports the broader AHA mission, including its goal to reduce heart-disease-related death and disabilities among Americans by 20 percent by the year 2020.

What Does It Mean to Go Red?

Since Go Red For Women launched, over 900,000 women have joined the initiative in order to improve their health. Women who “go red” eat healthily, exercise regularly, manage stress, and stay informed about their heart-health numbers by visiting their doctors for regular checkups. They also follow their doctors’ advice, taking medications and any other steps needed to improve their health.

Along with taking action for themselves, members of the Go Red For Women community work to improve public health by advocating for heart disease prevention. The initiative provides tools that participants can use to teach others healthy habits and promote access to quality, affordable healthcare. Go Red advocates take action through AHA initiatives such as You’re the Cure, which urges the US Congress to prioritize funding for heart disease and stroke research and prevention programs.

Ways to Support Go Red For Women

The best thing that people can do to support the Go Red initiative is to learn their heart numbers and take steps to improve their cardiovascular health using the information, tools, and resources available through the American Heart Association. Supporters can also make a donation or raise awareness about the initiative by joining a local Go Red meetup group or simply wearing their favorite red clothes.

Each year, the Go Red For Women community also hosts various fundraisers and awareness events, including National Wear Red Day. Supported by corporate sponsors such as Macy’s and CVS Pharmacy, National Wear Red Day brings men and women together on the first Friday in February to educate the public and raise awareness about the importance of heart disease prevention and screening.

Other Go Red For Women activities includes Macy’s Red Dress Collection event, an annual fundraiser held during New York Fashion Week. In 2018, Marisa Tomei hosted the event, which featured models and celebrities such as Kathy Ireland, Melissa Joan Hart, and Niki Taylor walking in Macy’s dresses designed for the Go Red For Women initiative.

More information about Go Red For Women programs and activities is available at http://www.goredforwomen.org.

Disclaimer: This website contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. This information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy or validity of any statements or information provided on this website. Do not rely on this information as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or another professional healthcare provider. You should seek immediate medical attention if you think you are suffering from a medical condition. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website.

boys and girls club

Here Are the Top Ways BGCA Is Promoting STEM-Based Learning

Attaining success in the modern world requires a new type of skill set that centers on technological literacy and the ability to think critically and collaborate effectively with teams in physical and digital environments. To help young people develop 21st-century skills, schools and youth-driven organizations like Boys and Girls Clubs of America (BGCA) are promoting a mastery of fundamental academic subjects, such as history and language arts, while emphasizing education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines.

In 2014, BGCA hosted STEM Great Think, a national event that brought thought leaders from other nonprofit groups together with key influencers in education, government, and business to establish partnerships and programs for advancing STEM education in the out-of-school environment. Since then, Boys and Girls Clubs has continued to play a key role in inspiring youth, especially those from underserved backgrounds, to pursue an interest in STEM subjects both in and out of school. Read on for a look at what BGCA and its partners have been doing in the area of STEM education.

 

Closing the Opportunity Gap

All of BGCA’s efforts in STEM are focused on ensuring that every child, regardless of race, gender, or economic background, has the opportunity to attain success in an ever-changing world. Recently, the number of jobs in STEM fields has been growing nearly twice as fast as other disciplines. However, many young people are entering the workforce without the knowledge or skills needed to pursue a STEM career. The lack of skills and/or interest in STEM is especially prevalent among minority youth and young women, but kids and teens from low-income families are also affected.

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By offering after-school and summer educational programming to a large number of underrepresented youth, BGCA plays an important, and often unrecognized, role in closing the opportunity gap in STEM education. Past research has shown that the type of programs offered at Boys and Girls Clubs sparks young peoples’ interest in STEM fields and is particularly impactful for African-American, Asian-American, and Latino youth. According to BGCA’s 2017 National Outcomes Report, male and female 12th-grade Club members of all races and socioeconomic backgrounds are nearly twice as likely to show an interest in STEM fields as 12th graders who are not involved in their local Club.

 

Teaching Kids and Teens to Code

Boys and Girls Clubs across the country rely on corporate support to provide fun and educational STEM programs for their youth members. In 2017, BGCA and Lenovo launched a partnership to get Club members interested in coding and computer science. Through the partnership, 10 Clubs nationwide will expand their STEM programming to include app-building activities for kids and teens.

For its part, Lenovo, a leading technology provider, is offering PC equipment, computer programs, and volunteer support for “Hackathon” events at local Clubs. During the events, youth teams work with Lenovo employee volunteers to create working app prototypes. The teams then present their apps for a chance to win prizes.

The Hackathon partnership with BGCA is an extension of the long-standing relationship that Lenovo has had with local Clubs near its US global headquarters at North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park. In addition to the Wake County Boys and Girls Club in Raleigh, Clubs in Georgia, Connecticut, California, and Florida are benefitting from the Lenovo-BGCA partnership.

 

Launching STEM Centers of Innovation

Across the country and in many locations overseas, BGCA serves youth in communities that have a strong military presence. The organization began partnering with the US military nearly three decades ago and now serves over 480,000 school-aged children of military families worldwide. To help BGCA provide high-quality STEM experiences for military youth, Raytheon Company has committed $5 million to create Stem Centers of Innovation at BGCA-affiliated military installations.

To date, Raytheon has created 14 Centers of Innovation as part of its five-year funding initiative. A full-time STEM expert is available to assist youth at all of the Centers, which offer fun STEM-based programming and exciting technologies such as 3-D printers and high-definition video equipment. Centers of Innovation have been opened in Germany and several US states, including Arizona, Florida, Hawaii, and Texas. Thanks to a recent $1 million donation from The Walt Disney Company, BGCA will be able to open 12 new additional STEM Centers of Innovation in communities throughout the nation.

 

Supporting 21st-Century Teaching and Learning

Over the past few years, BGCA has been working toward a goal of engaging at least half of all Club members in some type of STEM-based programming by 2020. Clubs across the country are facilitating these efforts by offering programs such as DIY STEM. Corporations such as Samsung and Time Warner Cable have supported the program, which teaches scientific principles through hands-on activities and learning modules.

BGCA also offers STEM experiences during the summer through its Summer Brain Gain learning loss prevention program. It includes project-based activities for Club youth in elementary through high school. BGCA’s other science-based programs include Tech Girls Rock, a national initiative that supports information technology workshops for tween and teen girls 10 to 18 years old.