Goodwill

Top Ways You Can Support Your Local Goodwill

For over 115 years, Goodwill Industries has been helping individuals and families reach their full potential. The organization does this by investing profits from local Goodwill locations into various programs focused on employment, education, and skills training.

In 2017 alone, Goodwill helped connect over 288,000 people with employment in various industries, including information technology, banking, and healthcare. Additionally, more than 2.1 million people used Goodwill services for career advancement and financial guidance in 2017. Another 30,000 individuals turned to a local Goodwill organization for help in earning credentials such as training certificates and college degrees.

While Goodwill remains committed to its mission to strengthen communities, the nonprofit cannot accomplish its goals alone. The organization receives government grants as well as corporate and foundational support. However, it is most dependent on the donations and assistance it receives from individuals in communities across the country.

If you’re interested in joining those helping to advance Goodwill’s mission, you can do so in a number of ways. Here are some of the things you can do right now to get involved:

Donate Items to a Local Goodwill Organization

One of the easiest ways to support the nonprofit is by donating items that you and your family no longer need to a local Goodwill organization. Goodwill is happy to accept a wide range of items, including toys, clothing, books, home décor, electronics, and furniture.

Goodwill

Image courtesy Mike Mozart | Flickr

Before making your donation, it’s important to inspect the items to ensure that they are in working order and include any necessary parts. Also, while clothing and furniture certainly don’t need to be in perfect condition, items that are free of large rips, holes, and stains will likely do the most good. Goodwill also suggests that would-be donors contact their local organization before donating items such as computers, vehicles, and mattresses to see if there are any rules concerning these types of donations.

To find the nearest Goodwill, donors can visit the organization’s website and use the locator tool at the top of the homepage. Those who are unable to visit a location in person may be able to request a donation pickup. A simple phone call can help you find out if pickup service is available in your area.

Goodwill also maintains donation bins, which are a convenient option for many people. However, the organization recommends that donors inspect bins before dropping off any items to ensure that they are maintained by Goodwill rather than a for-profit group.

Volunteer Your Time or Contribute Financially

If you’re looking to give back to your community, volunteering at a local Goodwill is a great way to do just that. The organization offers opportunities for people to volunteer online or in person.

Professionals can assist people interested in entering their career field by working as a virtual career mentor for GoodProspects. This online community assists jobseekers and those looking to grow in their profession.

Goodwill also oversees a national youth mentoring program, GoodGuides. This program provides guidance and support to help at-risk youth 12 to 17 years of age make positive decisions. GoodGuides welcomes both peer and adult mentors who can devote one hour a week to the program.

Along with volunteering, you can support Goodwill by making a one-time or recurring cash donation online, by phone, or via traditional mail. Goodwill gratefully accepts donations of all sizes and gives donors the option of directing their funds to a local organization or its national programs and activities.

In addition to accepting direct financial contributions, Goodwill oversees a planned giving program for those who would like to include Goodwill in their wills or declare the organization a beneficiary of their retirement plan. More information about the program and how your donations are put to good use is available at www.goodwill.org/give.

Work as a Goodwill Advocate

Through its Advocacy Action Center, Goodwill Industries advances public policy that supports job training and employee placement programs in local communities. Currently, Goodwill is working to promote and advance key human services issues to help older workers, individuals with criminal backgrounds, and veterans overcome barriers to gainful employment. The organization also advocates for the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program and employment opportunities for young people.

In addition to its activities in the areas of workforce development and job creation, Goodwill Industries works with members of Congress and other key decision makers to protect charitable giving incentives and develop legislation regarding the disposal of electronic waste. Moreover, the organization protects employer priorities as an advocate for the AbilityOne program. AbilityOne provides employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities or visual impairment.

Those interested in getting involved can join the efforts by registering as an advocate online to receive updates about the organization’s latest advocacy activities. Goodwill advocates can also reach out to their local elected officials and political candidates to share why it’s important to protect opportunities for working families.

Featured Image courtesy Mike Mozart | Flickr

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boys and girls club

Here Are the Top Ways BGCA Is Promoting STEM-Based Learning

Attaining success in the modern world requires a new type of skill set that centers on technological literacy and the ability to think critically and collaborate effectively with teams in physical and digital environments. To help young people develop 21st-century skills, schools and youth-driven organizations like Boys and Girls Clubs of America (BGCA) are promoting a mastery of fundamental academic subjects, such as history and language arts, while emphasizing education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines.

In 2014, BGCA hosted STEM Great Think, a national event that brought thought leaders from other nonprofit groups together with key influencers in education, government, and business to establish partnerships and programs for advancing STEM education in the out-of-school environment. Since then, Boys and Girls Clubs has continued to play a key role in inspiring youth, especially those from underserved backgrounds, to pursue an interest in STEM subjects both in and out of school. Read on for a look at what BGCA and its partners have been doing in the area of STEM education.

 

Closing the Opportunity Gap

All of BGCA’s efforts in STEM are focused on ensuring that every child, regardless of race, gender, or economic background, has the opportunity to attain success in an ever-changing world. Recently, the number of jobs in STEM fields has been growing nearly twice as fast as other disciplines. However, many young people are entering the workforce without the knowledge or skills needed to pursue a STEM career. The lack of skills and/or interest in STEM is especially prevalent among minority youth and young women, but kids and teens from low-income families are also affected.

science

By offering after-school and summer educational programming to a large number of underrepresented youth, BGCA plays an important, and often unrecognized, role in closing the opportunity gap in STEM education. Past research has shown that the type of programs offered at Boys and Girls Clubs sparks young peoples’ interest in STEM fields and is particularly impactful for African-American, Asian-American, and Latino youth. According to BGCA’s 2017 National Outcomes Report, male and female 12th-grade Club members of all races and socioeconomic backgrounds are nearly twice as likely to show an interest in STEM fields as 12th graders who are not involved in their local Club.

 

Teaching Kids and Teens to Code

Boys and Girls Clubs across the country rely on corporate support to provide fun and educational STEM programs for their youth members. In 2017, BGCA and Lenovo launched a partnership to get Club members interested in coding and computer science. Through the partnership, 10 Clubs nationwide will expand their STEM programming to include app-building activities for kids and teens.

For its part, Lenovo, a leading technology provider, is offering PC equipment, computer programs, and volunteer support for “Hackathon” events at local Clubs. During the events, youth teams work with Lenovo employee volunteers to create working app prototypes. The teams then present their apps for a chance to win prizes.

The Hackathon partnership with BGCA is an extension of the long-standing relationship that Lenovo has had with local Clubs near its US global headquarters at North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park. In addition to the Wake County Boys and Girls Club in Raleigh, Clubs in Georgia, Connecticut, California, and Florida are benefitting from the Lenovo-BGCA partnership.

 

Launching STEM Centers of Innovation

Across the country and in many locations overseas, BGCA serves youth in communities that have a strong military presence. The organization began partnering with the US military nearly three decades ago and now serves over 480,000 school-aged children of military families worldwide. To help BGCA provide high-quality STEM experiences for military youth, Raytheon Company has committed $5 million to create Stem Centers of Innovation at BGCA-affiliated military installations.

To date, Raytheon has created 14 Centers of Innovation as part of its five-year funding initiative. A full-time STEM expert is available to assist youth at all of the Centers, which offer fun STEM-based programming and exciting technologies such as 3-D printers and high-definition video equipment. Centers of Innovation have been opened in Germany and several US states, including Arizona, Florida, Hawaii, and Texas. Thanks to a recent $1 million donation from The Walt Disney Company, BGCA will be able to open 12 new additional STEM Centers of Innovation in communities throughout the nation.

 

Supporting 21st-Century Teaching and Learning

Over the past few years, BGCA has been working toward a goal of engaging at least half of all Club members in some type of STEM-based programming by 2020. Clubs across the country are facilitating these efforts by offering programs such as DIY STEM. Corporations such as Samsung and Time Warner Cable have supported the program, which teaches scientific principles through hands-on activities and learning modules.

BGCA also offers STEM experiences during the summer through its Summer Brain Gain learning loss prevention program. It includes project-based activities for Club youth in elementary through high school. BGCA’s other science-based programs include Tech Girls Rock, a national initiative that supports information technology workshops for tween and teen girls 10 to 18 years old.

veterans

Here Are the Top Community Partners at Wounded Warrior Project

As one of the nation’s top veterans services organizations, Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) oversees a range of life-changing programs for those who have served their country. The organization also supports family members and caregivers of veterans by assisting with Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense claims and providing opportunities for military families to connect with one another in their communities. In 2017 WWP invested $166 million into programs that promote wounded veterans’ physical and mental health, emotional well-being, and independence.

Although WWP already offers programs in a variety of areas, the organization is always looking for better and more efficient ways to improve the lives of those in the military community. WWP extends its reach by working with individual volunteers and corporate supporters as well as a network of community partners. This network includes nonprofit groups working to assist veterans and military families throughout the country. The following is a closer look at WWP’s top community partners:

 

America’s Warrior Partnership

americaswarriorpartnershipThe mission of America’s Warrior Partnership is to bring veteran-focused nonprofits together to improve various initiatives for military families. Rather than working directly with veterans, the solution-based organization provides support, tools, and resources to help communities nationwide serve local veteran populations.

America’s Warrior Partnership’s signature initiative is its Community Integration program, which provides affiliate communities with a customizable framework for service in eight areas, including health, housing, education, and employment. America’s Warrior Partnership also oversees an annual symposium that educates veteran-serving professionals about the latest service solutions available.

 

Military Child Education Coalition

militarychildeducationcoalitionBased in Texas, the Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC) works with individuals and organizations across the country to ensure military children have access to quality educational opportunities. MCEC focuses much of its work on helping military installations and surrounding school districts address the academic and social needs of children who move multiple times and must deal with family separation throughout the school year because of their parent’s or parents’ military service.

In addition to a number of programs and training events for educators and other school professionals, MCEC offers various resources for military-connected parents and students. Through its Parent to Parent program, the organization conducts workshops that empower military families to advocate for the needs of their children. MCEC also oversees Student 2 Student, a national program that helps ease transitions to and from schools for military children in grades K-12.

 

Team RWB

teamrwbIn its mission to enrich the lives of America’s military veterans, Team RWB oversees physical and social activities that help veterans connect with one another and their communities. Team RWB activities include athletic and exercise events, community service projects, and small social gatherings. In 2017 the organization held more than 47,000 events in cities across the country. Team RWB currently serves over 137,000 veteran members through 204 local chapters nationwide.

 

National Military Family Association

NMFAAs the name suggests, the National Military Family Association (NMFA) is focused on supporting the spouses, children, and other family members of those serving in the United States military. Since its founding in 1969, the organization has played a key role in advancing several initiatives benefiting military families. The group’s past successes include helping to pass the Survivor Benefit Plan and extend Supplemental Security Income benefits to military families stationed overseas.

More recently, NMFA established a scholarship program for military spouses and launched its Operation Purple youth camps and family retreats to help families reconnect and take a break from the stresses of military life. The organization also provides information and resources on a variety of topics.

 

Team Rubicon

teamrubiconTeam Rubicon leverages the skills and experiences of military veterans to support emergency response efforts around the globe. The volunteer-led organization comprises 65,000 registered members who work alongside first responders and medical professionals in areas affected by natural disasters. Although veterans are not the focus of Team Rubicon’s mission, the organization provides a purpose, community, and identity to help individuals transition from life in the military.

Since 2010, Team Rubicon members have provided nearly $11 million in volunteer labor. Volunteers assist with disaster cleanup, incident management, damage assessment, hazard mitigation, and community rebuilding. The Team has responded to numerous natural disasters across the United States, including Hurricanes Harvey and Maria. Team Rubicon has also completed operations in Europe, Asia, Africa, and South America.

 

The Mission Continues

themissioncontinuesLike Team Rubicon, The Mission Continues provides military veterans with the opportunity to continue to serve after their time in the armed forces ends. Volunteers with the organization work alongside other nonprofit groups to address issues facing their communities. The Mission Continues also deploys teams of volunteers to support cleanups, building renovations, and other community revitalization projects.

Along with holding local weekly, monthly, and quarterly events, volunteers with The Mission Continues take part in weeklong mass deployment projects in underserved cities nationwide. The organization also oversees a fellowship program for post-9/11 veterans and reservists who are interested in volunteering six months of their time in exchange for a living stipend and assistance with leadership and professional development.

This Is What Happened during 2018 Boys and Girls Club Week

boysandgirlsclubEach year, the youth, staff, volunteers, and supporters of Boys and Girls Clubs of America celebrate the organization during Boys and Girls Club Week. First held more than 75 years ago, the annual event now highlights the work of the over 61,000 adults who serve Club youth in US cities and at military installations overseas. This year’s Boys and Girls Club Week ran the week of April 9, with local Clubs and community partners participating in an effort to show why Boys and Girls Clubs are a place for youth to become the best versions of themselves.

Here’s a closer look at what happened across the country in celebration of Boys and Girls Club Week 2018:

Celebrating Community through Service Projects and Fun Activities

boys and girls club

Boys and Girls Clubs throughout the United States rely on community support to provide a safe place for youth to learn, grow, and have fun. Boys and Girls Club Week provides a perfect opportunity for Clubs to open their doors to the public for fun activities that celebrate community while highlighting the importance of local youth programming. Many Clubs took advantage of this opportunity in 2018 by holding talent shows, sports competitions, family game nights, art shows, and Club open-house events. Others celebrated the week by bringing Club youth and their families together for community service projects.

In Glasgow, Kentucky, members of the Boys and Girls Club of Glasgow-Barren County handed out basic needs kits to residents of a local low-income housing community. Youth from the Boys and Girls Club of Western Nevada Carson Valley created care packages for the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, and Club members in Shreveport, Louisiana, spent a day beautifying a local public park. Other organizations that gave back during Boys and Girls Club week included the Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club of High Point in North Carolina, which hosted a cookie and punch party for senior citizens.

The Blue Door Decorating Contest

For the last several years, the Blue Door Decorating Contest has been a major component of Boys and Girls Club Week. The Lowe’s-sponsored contest gives youth the opportunity to show off their artistic skills and love for Boys and Girls Clubs by decorating a door at their local Club. Those who participate compete for a chance to win cash prizes.

In 2018 Boys and Girls Clubs narrowed a field of 646 competing organizations down to six regional finalists. The contest wrapped up on April 12 after online public voting selected Boys Club of Cicero in Illinois as the grand prize winner. The Club’s “Dream Free” design earned the organization a $20,000 grant courtesy of Lowe’s. Lowe’s also awarded the second-place Club a $7,500 grant and the remaining finalists $2,500 each.

Recognizing Outstanding Youth Development Professionals     

In addition to the Blue Door Decorating Contest, Boys and Girls Club of America holds its Youth Development Professional of the Year contest in conjunction with Boys and Girls Club Week. The national contest recognizes the work of caring adults who mentor kids and teens at 4,300 Clubs nationwide.

Of the estimated 100 Club leaders nominated for the 2018 award, Boys and Girls Clubs selected five finalists representing Colorado, North Carolina, California, Missouri, and Pennsylvania. This year’s winner, Raytrell Caldwell of North Carolina, took home $10,000 for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Wayne/Johnston Counties, where he serves as the teen program director. He also won a trip to New York City to see BCGA National Spokesperson Denzel Washington in Broadway’s The Iceman Cometh.

Welcoming New Club Facilities

Several Clubs across the country used Boys and Girls Club Week to celebrate the opening of new facilities. Club youth in Santa Cruz, California, got their first look at the refurbished Joe and Linda Aliberti Clubhouse in Scotts Valley. In addition to a lab with 12 desktop computers, the 3,000-square-foot facility features a new basketball court, a game room, and an art room. Club leaders are also installing a garden on the grounds.

In Maryland, Boys and Girls Club of Westminster opened doors on a new 20,000-square-foot facility that will eventually serve 600 local children and teens each day. The renovated building, located in downtown Westminster, was completed as part of a one-year, $5 million fundraising campaign. The space includes a library, book nooks, and a music and dance studio alongside two lounges filled with new furniture, games, and study areas. Eventually, the property will also feature a brand new gymnasium.

Along with those that opened new facilities during Boys and Girls Club Week, other Clubs announced the launch of new development projects. In Texas, Boys and Girls Clubs of the Austin Area unveiled details for a 10-acre East Austin campus that will provide programming for 1,000 area youth. Highlights of the planned 32,000-square-foot campus include art studios, a library, and a STEM learning center, as well as indoor and outdoor athletic facilities.