Goodwill

9 Reasons Why Donating to Goodwill Is a Good Idea

goodwill logoWhether you have an overflowing closet or too many books, clutter around the home can become overwhelming. When it comes time to rid yourself of the things you no longer need or want, you have several options. You can host a yard sale, which can be a lot of work, or simply throw items in the trash, which is wasteful. A third—and better—option is to donate your items to Goodwill Industries. Here are nine reasons why donating to Goodwill is a good idea:

 

  1. Donating is an easy way to declutter your home.

Clutter has a way of sneaking up on you. Slowly but surely, all of the casual purchases you make over the years can lead to stuffed cupboards, messy drawers, overflowing playrooms, and sagging clothes racks. Purge yourself of the clutter by donating to Goodwill. In addition to clothing, Goodwill accepts a range of items, such as toys, books, games, electronics, jewelry, and housewares.

 

  1. Giving items a second life keeps them out of landfills.

Along with helping you maintain a cleaner home, donating to Goodwill keeps gently used items out of the nation’s landfills. While it may be tempting to simply toss your unwanted stuff in the trash, choosing to donate it instead reduces waste and lessens your overall impact on the environment. In 2018 alone, donations to local Goodwill organizations diverted over 4 billion pounds of usable goods from landfills and put them into the hands of new owners.

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  1. Goodwill donations fund job training programs.

In communities across the country, people looking to donate unwanted items have their choice of many different thrift stores. When you choose to donate to Goodwill, however, you can feel good knowing that revenue from your donations is being used to fund programs that help people build skills, find jobs, and advance their careers. Each year, millions of people worldwide benefit from Goodwill’s employment programs and services.

 

  1. All donations are tax-deductible.

If you’re looking for a tax break, making a donation to Goodwill is a smart move. Those who choose to itemize deductions on their taxes may be able to deduct the value of their Goodwill donations from their overall tax obligation. To do this, however, it’s important to ask your donation attendant for a receipt when you drop the items off. Goodwill also offers a downloadable donation valuation guide to help you estimate the value of commonly donated items.

 

  1. Goodwill is a great resource for low-cost items.

Although Goodwill strives to get the most revenue from donated items, the organization also works to provide shoppers with quality products at affordable prices. By donating to Goodwill, you’re helping to provide an excellent resource for low-income members of your community who are looking to save on clothing, dishes, electronics, and many other items.

 

  1. You can set a good example by donating.

If you are a parent looking for ways to teach your children about the importance of giving, making a donation to Goodwill is a great way to do it. Set an example by donating your own items, but don’t forget to get your kids in on the action as well. When you ask your child to donate a few of their things to help others, they can experience the intrinsic value of giving. Not only that, but it also helps declutter their bedrooms and play areas, which is always a good thing.

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  1. Donating electronics helps with the growing problem of e-waste.

In today’s tech-driven world, it seems that there’s always a new electronic gadget hitting the market. While it may be necessary to upgrade to a new phone or tablet once in a while, it’s important that you properly dispose of the devices you are no longer using. Fortunately, with the support of corporate partners such as Dell Technologies, Goodwill makes it easy to recycle used electronics. Over the years, Dell and Goodwill have worked together to keep millions of pounds of e-waste out of local landfills.

 

  1. It’s easy to donate to Goodwill.

One of the best things about donating to Goodwill is how easy it is. With a national network of more than 155 Goodwill organizations, it is very likely that you have at least one in your community or a nearby city. Donating is as simple as gathering and packing up your unwanted items and driving them to a donation center, where an attendant will help you with the rest of the process.

 

  1. Giving back feels good.

Regardless of your initial reason for donating to Goodwill, you can feel good knowing that you have done something to help your community. Every donation, big or small, goes to support Goodwill’s mission to strengthen communities by helping people reach their full potential. You can learn more about the personal impact of your donation by visiting www.goodwill.org/my-story.

 

 

Disclaimer: This website contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy or validity of any statements or information provided on this website. Do not rely on this information as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or another professional healthcare provider. You should seek immediate medical attention if you think you are suffering from a medical condition. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website. 

achievement

Introducing Wounded Warrior’s Dedicated Board of Directors

wounded warrior projectAlongside an executive leadership team headed by CEO Mike Linnington, Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) operates under the guidance of a 12-member board of directors that provides governance and oversight for the group’s various programs and activities.

Drawing on their diverse backgrounds in military, government, nonprofit, business, and medicine, the board members work together to ensure that WWP is meeting the needs of veterans while gaining the resources required to continue its programs well into the future.

In January 2020, Wounded Warrior strengthened its board by adding three new members with both military and business leadership experience. Keep reading for a brief introduction to the new members and the rest of the WWP board of directors.

 

Kathy Hildreth

A former test pilot and aviation maintenance officer in the US Army, Kathy Hildreth served in the military for over five years before going on to launch a career in the defense industry. Her company, M1 Support Services, carries out complex government support contracts and is dedicated to providing jobs for military veterans. Along with Bill Selman and Ken Hunzeker, Hildreth is among the newest members of the WWP board.

 

Lt. Col. (Ret.) Bill Selman

West Point graduate Bill Selman served as an active-duty Army officer for five years and continued his military service in the Army Reserve, eventually retiring as a lieutenant colonel. As a civilian, he has held various leadership positions in finance, sales, engineering, and insurance while supporting various nonprofit groups.

 

Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Ken Hunzeker

Also a West Point graduate, Ken Hunzeker commanded various Army forces throughout a military career spanning 35 years. After retiring from the military in 2010, he worked for several years in government relations. Hunzeker’s recent accolades include his selection as a 2020 Distinguished Graduate of the US Military Academy.

 

Lisa Disbrow

Lisa Disbrow joined the US Air Force in 1985. Her military career, which spanned over three decades, included work in signals/electronic intelligence and deployments during Operations Desert Storm and Southern Watch. Disbrow’s activities since retiring from the Air Force Reserve in 2008 include serving as the 25th Under Secretary of the US Air Force.

 

Command Sgt. Maj. (Ret.) Michael T. Hall

Like many other members of the WWP board of directors, Michael T. Hall has spent his entire adult life in service to his country. As an Army officer, he completed multiple deployments and earned several decorations, including the Bronze Star Medal and Distinguished Service Medal. Hall retired after 34 years of military service and has since worked as a defense consultant, executive coach, and dedicated supporter of several veterans organizations.

 

Juan Garcia

Currently a managing director at Deloitte in Washington, DC, Juan Garcia previously served for six years as the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs). He was appointed to the leadership position after serving active and reserve Navy duty for over 15 years. Alongside his military service, Garcia, who holds a juris doctor and a master in public policy from Harvard, has worked as an attorney and member of the Texas House of Representatives.

 

Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Rick Tryon

Lieutenant General Rick Tryon retired from the Marine Corps in 2014 after nearly four and a half decades of military service. His military career began in 1970 and included leadership assignments in Japan, Iraq, Turkey, and several European countries. In addition to serving on the WWP board of directors and WWP advisory council, Tryon serves as a senior fellow in international leadership at the University of North Florida.

 

Cari DeSantis

With a professional background focused on government and nonprofit organizational management, Cari DeSantis brings unique expertise to the WWP board of directors, which she joined in 2017. Much of her work has focused on the health and human services sector. Alongside her activities with WWP, DeSantis currently leads a Maryland-based nonprofit that connects people of differing abilities with employment opportunities.

Named one of the Top 100 Women for 2017 by the Daily Record in Maryland, DeSantis is an award-winning author of three books.

 

Command Sgt. Maj. (Ret.) Alonzo Smith

Alonzo Smith is an experienced combat veteran with firsthand knowledge of the difficulties faced by the nation’s wounded warriors. During a deployment to Afghanistan, Smith sustained severe wounds that led to several surgeries, prolonged hospital stays, and a long recovery process aided by physical rehabilitation. Following his 33-year military career, he has been dedicated to helping his fellow veterans as a WWP alumnus and board member.

 

Kathleen Widmer

Another West Point graduate, Kathleen Widmer has balanced her professional pursuits in business management and marketing leadership with her activities as an advocate for military veterans. Her work in this area includes serving as co-chair of the Veterans Leadership Council at Johnson & Johnson. Since 2018, Widmer has helped lead the WWP board of directors as vice chair.

 

Dr. Jonathan Woodson

Board certified in internal medicine, general surgery, vascular surgery, and critical care surgery, Dr. Jonathan Woodson joined the WWP board of directors in 2016 and now serves as board chair. Outside of his work at WWP, Dr. Woodson has held positions in the Military Health System, including Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs. He currently serves as a professor of surgery, management, health law, and policy at Boston University Medical Center in addition to serving as Army Reserve Medical Command commanding general.

 

Lt. Col. (Ret.) Justin Constantine

Like Sergeant Major Alonzo Smith, Lieutenant Colonel Justin Constantine has also overcome wounds received in military combat. After miraculously recovering from a sniper gunshot to the head, he joined WWP and launched a civilian career that has included work as an inspirational speaker and writer on military and leadership issues. For his courage and work with military veterans, WWP awarded him the George C. Lang Award and appointed him to board of directors in 2011. Today, he stands out as the group’s longest-serving member.

 

Disclaimer: This website contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. This information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy or validity of any statements or information provided on this website. Do not rely on this information as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or another professional healthcare provider. You should seek immediate medical attention if you think you are suffering from a medical condition. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website. 

soldier

A Look at the Wounded Warrior Project’s Goals for 2020

woundedwarriorprojectIn 2003, the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) began with an initiative to deliver backpacks to veterans recovering from combat-related injuries at Walter Reed Medical Center in Washington, DC. From those humble beginnings, the organization has grown to become a national leader in providing programs and services designed to help veterans and their families to thrive outside of the military. Following its successes in 2019, WWP has major plans as it moves into the next decade. Read on for a look at the organization’s goals for 2020 and beyond.

 

Adapting to Veterans’ Changing Needs

With an understanding that all veterans transitioning from the military have their own unique needs, challenges, and goals, WWP provides programs and services that cover areas ranging from physical and mental wellness to education, career guidance, and peer and family support. Other initiatives focus on helping veterans to obtain Veteran Affairs (VA) benefits and gain independence following a moderate-to-severe physical injury or neurological condition.

As part of its efforts to ensure that it is effectively meeting the needs of the individuals and families that it serves, WWP conducts an annual survey that examines key issues facing the military community. In late 2019, the organization released the results of its 10th Annual Warrior Survey, which it will use throughout 2020 to inform and adapt its programming.

An area of concern highlighted in the 2019 survey deals with the ongoing physical and mental trauma of service-related and combat exposure following three or more deployments. Throughout 2020 and beyond, WWP will work closely with the government and other veterans service organizations to raise awareness about this issue and ensure that those affected receive the assistance that they need.

veterans

Continuing to Support Mental Health

Since its inception, WWP has focused on helping veterans to overcome post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), anxiety, depression, and other mental health conditions. In 2020, the organization will continue to offer services in this area, as more members of the military community reach out for help.

WWP’s mental-health initiatives include its Warrior Care Network, a program that provides intensive outpatient treatment for veterans and their family members at no cost to them. During the 2019 fiscal year, more than 2,100 people benefitted from the network, which is maintained by WWP and four US-based medical centers. Ensuring that this partnership continues to thrive will remain a priority for WWP throughout 2020.

The Wounded Warrior Project will also continue to offer its many other mental health programs, such as rehabilitative workshops and retreats. Another service in this area includes WWP Talk, a free mental health support line that provides nonclinical counseling and guidance for registered WWP members.

 

Prioritizing Physical Health and Support Systems

Along with its various mental health services, WWP emphasizes the importance of physical activity and support among veterans striving to improve their health. In 2020, WWP members across the United States will take part in numerous activities, including adaptive sports events, fitness challenges, and online wellness seminars.

Additionally, the Wounded Warrior Project will continue providing hands-on assistance through its coaching program, which is designed to help veterans lose weight, increase mobility, and improve their nutritional habits. Other programs and initiatives to watch for in 2020 include Soldier Ride, a cycling event for veterans of all ability levels that has helped thousands of WWP members to overcome physical, mental, and emotional challenges while building camaraderie with other service members.

 

Partnering to Help Warriors Improve Their Financial Well-Being

Regardless of whether they’re dealing with physical or mental health issues, many veterans face financial challenges when transitioning to civilian life. Fortunately, WWP offers financial wellness programs designed to help veterans navigate the VA benefits system, pursue fulfilling careers, and access the benefits that they deserve. In 2019, these services helped WWP members to secure nearly $220 million in collective salaries and benefits.

Going forward, the Wounded Warrior Project will continue to offer career-development assistance with support from local businesses, as well as national corporate partners. This includes Deloitte, which teamed up with WWP in 2019 to operate over 15 employment boot camps in communities across the United States.

In 2020, Deloitte and the Wounded Warrior Project will again partner to offer an additional 15 employment boot camps throughout the year. Over the span of two to three days, each training session will provide 20 to 30 veterans and their family members with instruction on interview skills, resume writing, business etiquette, and other areas related to career development.

 

Reaching Out for Community Support

As a nonprofit, WWP would not be able to provide any of its life-changing programs and services without the assistance of volunteers and donors. Throughout 2020, the organization will focus on expanding its support network as it works to improve and extend the reach of its offerings.

Those looking to help WWP attain its goals can do so by making a one-time financial contribution or by setting up a recurring donation. People can also become involved by hosting a fundraiser or participating in WWP events, such as the Carry Forward 5K. In 2020, the Wounded Warrior Project will host Carry Forward events in California, Tennessee, Texas, Pennsylvania, and Florida. More information is available at WoundedWarriorProject.org.

 

Disclaimer: This website contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. This information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy or validity of any statements or information provided on this website. Do not rely on this information as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or another professional health-care provider. You should seek immediate medical attention if you think you are suffering from a medical condition. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website. 

alaska

A Spotlight on the Big Ways BGCA Serves Native Youth

boysandgirlsclubIn addition to serving youth in major cities nationwide, Boys and Girls Clubs of America (BBCA) maintains over 1,000 Clubs in rural areas. These include many communities on Native lands, which are home to American Indian, Alaska Native, American Samoan, and Hawaiian tribal youth. Along with the challenges that affect young people of all cultural backgrounds, those in Native communities often have unique needs that aren’t being addressed by local programs.

As part of a commitment to promote and expand youth development initiatives among Native kids and teens, BGCA established its Native Services arm in partnership with tribal leaders and other key stakeholders on tribal lands. Keep reading to learn more about BGCA Native Services and what it’s doing to improve the lives of Native youth.

 

Challenges Facing Native Communities

Across the United States, there are many self-governing Native American communities that are home to over 570 federally recognized tribes. Each of these groups has its own rich culture, heritage, language, and traditions. Unfortunately, many Native communities also face unique challenges that make it difficult for tribe members, including Native youth, to reach their full potential.

Although many young tribe members thrive and succeed in life, Native youth are among the most vulnerable populations in the country. In addition to experiencing high rates of poverty, a disproportionate number of Native youth face challenges related to physical and nutritional health, mental wellness, substance abuse, and education. A lack of local resources and the isolation of some Native communities can make these challenges even more difficult to overcome.

 

What BGCA Native Services Is Doing to Help

The mission of BGCA Native Services is to help Native youth reach their full potential while celebrating the particular strengths and cultural traditions of the country’s tribal communities. Since launching Native Services in 1992, BGCA has expanded its offerings to become the largest youth-serving organization on Native land. Today, more than 86,000 youth from over 100 tribes benefit from programming offered through nearly 200 Native Clubs nationwide.

Over the years, BGCA has built sustainable partnerships with tribal leaders and invested resources toward improving the capacity of professional staff and other leaders of Native Clubs. As with Club programs outside of Native communities, those implemented by BGCA Native Services focus on physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development. BGCA has also worked closely with local tribes and community leaders to develop programming specific to the needs and cultures of Native youth.

 

Native Services Club Programs

Native Services Club programs cover each of BGCA’s five core program areas: Character and Leadership Development; Health and Life Skills; Education and Career Development; the Arts; and Sports, Fitness and Recreation. Native Club youth take part in national BGCA programs such as All Stars, DIY STEM, My.Future, and Smart Moves.

Through the work of Native Services leaders, the curriculum of each of these programs has been adapted to be more reflective of Native American culture. BGCA also encourages all local Native Club leaders to create supplemental materials and activities to further reflect their own community’s unique culture and traditions. Native Services even created its Cultural Program Toolbox to make it easier for Clubs to build and implement culturally relevant services.

Along with adapting existing BGCA programming, Native Services has developed programs that are only implemented in Native Clubs. They include On the T.R.A.I.L (Together Raising Awareness for Indian Life) to Diabetes Prevention. This program aims to reduce the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes among Native communities through a combination of physical, nutritional, and educational activities.

 

Keeping the Momentum Going

More than 25 years after launching Native Services, BGCA continues to build momentum as the top youth agency on Native lands. As part of its Great Futures 2025 Strategy, which was developed in 2017, the organization has established four key priorities for its activities with Native youth.

Going forward, Boys and Girls Clubs will work to increase the quality of Native Club programs and leadership while advocating for Native youth development. The group will also focus on growing the number of Native Club members as it continues to expand and improve programming.

BGCA Native Services has received significant support in these efforts from corporate and nonprofit partners. This includes the Walmart Foundation, which donated $500,000 to help BGCA provide Native kids and teens with education on healthy lifestyles and nutrition. The funding is supporting education and Club improvements at over two dozen Clubs on Native lands.

BGCA also relies on the support of individual donors to continue its Native Services programming. Supporters can make a tax-deductible donation to the Native American Sustainability Fund to ensure that Native Clubs continue to thrive. Each dollar donated to the fund is used to increase Club sustainability, foster organizational growth, and provide training resources and technical support for Native Club leaders.

More information about BGCA Native Services and ways you can help is available at www.naclubs.org.

 

Disclaimer: This website contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. This information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy or validity of any statements or information provided on this website. Do not rely on this information as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or another professional healthcare provider. You should seek immediate medical attention if you think you are suffering from a medical condition. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website.