military running

This Is a Full Look at Wounded Warrior’s Carry Forward 5K Challenge

wounded warrior projectAs a nonprofit organization dependent on the support of volunteers and donors, Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) offers a variety of ways for people to get involved in advancing its work assisting military veterans and their families. It maintains corporate and community partnerships and oversees fundraising initiatives such as workplace giving programs.

In addition, the organization works with community members nationwide to host various events in cities throughout the country. One of WWP’s newest and most unique events is its Carry Forward 5K. Here’s a complete look at this fundraiser and awareness fitness challenge:

 

What is the Carry Forward 5K?

WWP’s Carry Forward 5K is an event that gives participants the opportunity to test their strength and stamina while raising money and awareness for the country’s military community. First launched in May 2018, this 5K challenge features three levels of participation for racers of all ability levels.

At the base level, individual participants and squads can show their patriotism and support for active-duty military members and veterans by carrying a flag throughout the 5K route. Those looking to increase the challenge can choose to carry a 1- to 100-pound weight as they run or walk to the finish line. Finally, participants seeking the ultimate challenge can carry another person from start to finish.

 

 

Where is it held?

Currently, WWP Carry Forward events are held in four US cities: San Diego, California; Nashville, Tennessee; San Antonio, Texas; and Jacksonville, Florida. The most recent Carry Forward 5K took place Saturday, August 24, 2019, in San Diego. Several celebrities participated in the event, including The Bachelor’s Colton Underwood and LA Chargers quarterback Cardale Jones. Along with the 5K, the Carry Forward activities included a morning concert featuring The Band Steele.

The 2019 Carry Forward series continues with 5Ks in Nashville on September 21, San Antonio on October 5, and Jacksonville on November 9. Fundraising seeks to generate between $100,000 and $200,000 for WWP’s various programs and services.

 

How can people get involved?

Those interested in taking part in a Carry Forward event have several options for getting involved. WWP supporters planning to walk, jog, or run the 5K can register as individual participants or members of a squad. Registering online for a Carry Forward event is a straightforward process that involves entering your name, choosing your event city, and selecting an activity level.

The standard adult registration fee is $35. With a promo code, active military members and veterans can receive $5 off, and youth participants ages 6 to 17 can receive $15 off. There is no registration fee for WWP Alumni participants. Individuals who don’t register online can still sign up the day of the event for $40.

In addition to paying the required registration fee, each participant is encouraged to lead their own Carry Forward fundraising campaign. WWP provides a variety of fundraising ideas, tools, and resources on its website. Along with receiving the satisfaction that comes from supporting the nation’s military community, fundraisers are rewarded for their efforts with gear and prizes such as Carry Forward shirts and other wearable mementos.

If you can’t make it to a Carry Forward city, you can register to host your own event in your community. These events must take place between July 4 and December 15 to qualify for fundraising incentives. Carry Forward supporters can also make general donations of any amount to the series online via a secure giving page.

 

What do Carry Forward events support?

As with other WWP fundraising initiatives, the money donated to Carry Forward events supports the organization’s wide range of programs, services, and activities for military veterans as well as their family members and caregivers. These programs focus on areas such as mental and physical wellness, career development, personal independence, and social interaction.

One of WWP’s major initiatives is its Wounded Care Network. It leverages a network of leading medical centers to provide comprehensive treatment for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other related conditions.

Wounded Warrior Project also oversees a resource center to help military veterans and family members sign up for WWP activities, process Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense benefits claims, and apply for emergency financial assistance. Other WWP programs focus on helping veterans connect with one another in their own communities.

Without Carry Forward and its other fundraising activities, WWP would not be able to continue providing these and other life-changing programs. The organization and its supporters raise tens of millions of dollars annually, including over $197 million in fiscal year 2018.

WWP fundraisers and supporters can also rest assured knowing that their time and resources are benefiting a great charity that maintains accreditation with the Better Business Bureau, top-rated status with Charity Navigator, and a GuideStar Platinum rating. More information about supporting Wounded Warrior Project can be found at www.woundedwarriorproject.org.

 

Disclaimer: This website contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. This information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy or validity of any statements or information provided on this website. Do not rely on this information as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or another professional healthcare provider. You should seek immediate medical attention if you think you are suffering from a medical condition. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website.

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MOPHlogo

Here Are the Top Programs the Purple Heart Foundation Supports

purpleheartfoundationWith origins dating back more than six decades, the Purple Heart Foundation has a long history of supporting initiatives for military veterans and their families. The group’s activities help ensure that the nation’s veterans can lead fulfilling lives after transitioning from military service.

Over the years, the Foundation has led programs that provide education, occupational training, health services, and support for those dealing with combat-related injuries and disabilities.

While the Purple Heart Foundation oversees several of its own programs and service initiatives, the group mainly functions as the fundraising arm of the Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH). Launched in 1932, the Order is the country’s only military service organization with a membership body made up entirely of Purple Heart recipients.

With support from the Foundation’s donors and fundraising activities, MOPH has been able to launch and grow a wide range of programs for the nation’s military community. Whether you are already a Purple Heart Foundation supporter or just now considering making a donation, take a look at some of the MOPH programs that receive funding from the Foundation’s donor dollars:

 

MOPH National Service Program

MOPH operates on an annual budget of approximately $6.4 million. Nearly $5 million of this is directed toward its National Service Program (NSP). Each year, approximately 125,000 veterans and their family members receive assistance via NSP. It operates through a nationwide network comprising 72 service offices staffed by over 100 trained National Service Officers.

The Order’s team of National Service Officers assist veterans in filing benefits claims with Veterans Affairs (VA). Regardless of whether they are a member of MOPH, veterans whose benefits have been denied by a local VA office can also turn to NSP for expert legal representation before the Board of Veterans Appeals and the Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims.

Among other things, NSP assists with VA claims related to employment, housing, education, job training, and medical care. Over 12,000 claims were submitted to the VA through the program in fiscal year 2017.

 

Purple Heart Trail

For more than 25 years, MOPH has been overseeing the Purple Heart Trail program. It aims to create a nationwide connected system of roadways, bridges, and monuments honoring the country’s Purple Heart recipients.

The idea for the Trail was first introduced by a member of MOPH Chapter 1732 in Virginia. The program was launched as an MOPH resolution during the organization’s 1992 National Convention in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

Following the launch of the Purple Heart Trail, the first monument was dedicated in Mt. Vernon, Virginia, George Washington’s burial location. Since then, the trail has been extended to 45 states as well as the United States territory of Guam. The local roads, highways, and monuments that make up the Trail are marked by signs of various designs and formats.

In addition to roadways and physical monuments, government leaders and citizens of local municipalities can work with MOPH to establish Purple Heart cities, counties, universities/colleges, etc. To find more information about the Purple Heart Trail and a map of current Purple Heart locations, visit www.purpleheart.org.

 

POW/MIA and Homeless Veteran Outreach

In addition to honoring men and women who have been wounded in combat, MOPH has worked throughout its history to ensure that prisoners of war and those reported missing in action are remembered and accounted for. The Order maintains a close relationship with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), which oversees a searchable online database of both unaccounted-for and accounted-for POWs/MIAs. MOPH provides a link to the DPAA database on its website.

Another area of focus at MOPH is homelessness among military veterans. While this issue has improved in recent years, it still persists. As part of MOPH’s efforts to assist veterans who have been displaced without a permanent residence, local chapters across the country participate in Stand Down events.

These provide food, shelter, clothing, medical support, and other services for the veteran community. On the national level, the Order works closely with VA and other groups to connect those in need with homelessness resources.

 

Promoting Americanism and Good Citizenry among Youth

Another major component of MOPH’s work is focused on promoting patriotism and a love of US history in the nation’s schools. The Order does this under the leadership of its National Americanism Officer, who helps connect teachers and leaders of other organizations with various educational resources.

These resources include printable PDF versions of patriotic songs and historical documents. MOPH’s website features PDFs of the Bill of Rights, Declaration of Independence, US Constitution, and The Star-Spangled Banner, among other documents.

The Order also encourages young people to serve their country through its support of senior and junior ROTC programs in public schools across the United States and Department of Defense schools worldwide.

Additionally, MOPH is currently working through its Veterans Affairs Volunteer Service program to create a new merit badge for the Boy and Girl Scouts of America. The proposed badge would recognize youth for volunteering their time to serve the nation’s veterans.

 

Disclaimer: This website contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. This information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy or validity of any statements or information provided on this website. Do not rely on this information as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or another professional healthcare provider. You should seek immediate medical attention if you think you are suffering from a medical condition. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website.

boys and girls club

A Look at the History of Boys and Girls Clubs of America

The roots of Boys and Girls Clubs of America (BGCA) can be traced back over 150 years to when three civic-minded Connecticut women organized the first club to help boys in need to get off the streets. From its humble beginnings, BGCA has become a well-respected national organization with a presence in communities across the country, as well as Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, and military bases worldwide. Keep reading for a closer look at the history and evolution of BGCA.

 

Early History – Club Beginnings

boysandgirlsclubIn 1860, sisters Mary and Alice Goodwin joined Elizabeth Hammersley in founding the first club that would form the basis of BGCA. Known as The Dashaway Club, it began casually when the women invited a group of boys roaming the streets into their Hartford, Connecticut, homes for refreshments and recreation. The Dashaway Club soon expanded its home-based locations, leading the founders to rent a meeting hall to hold activities for club participants.

Two decades after its founding, The Dashaway Club underwent a reorganization led by another prominent Hartford woman, Mary Stuart Hall. Hall, who was Connecticut’s first female lawyer, renamed the club The Good Will Boys Club and directed its focus on proving that misbehaved street children could develop into productive members of society if given the right support and guidance. She specifically used her background in law to teach the boys and young men societal rules and expectations. Hall worked closely with the club for nearly five decades until her death in 1927.

 

Clubs Spread across the Country

By the time Hall began the reorganization of The Dashaway Club, similar organizations had already been established in cities outside of Hartford. One of the first of these was a club in New Haven that formed in the early 1870s. Led by John C. Collins, the club was based on a system of supportive guidance that is still a large part of the BGCA environment. Collins went on to develop a network of clubs throughout Connecticut and Massachusetts.

Another early club, and one of the first to use “Boys’ Club” in its name, was The Boys’ Club of New York. The organization was founded in 1876 on the East Side of Manhattan by railroad magnate E.H. Harriman. As it grew in popularity, the club had to move to a five-story building to accommodate the large number of members. Soon, these early boys’ clubs in New York and New England were joined by similar organizations in other parts of the country. By the early 20th century, over three dozen clubs were operating in cities such as Philadelphia, Indianapolis, Nashville, and San Francisco.

 

Becoming a National Organization

The growing number of boys’ clubs in the United States led a group of early club leaders to join forces as part of a national movement. Their work led to the founding of the Federated Boys’ Clubs in 1906. The 53 clubs that comprised the federated union were the original members of a national organization that would be renamed Boys’ Clubs Federation in 1915 and Boys’ Clubs of America in 1931.

Over the next few decades, the Boys’ Clubs movement continued to spread across the country. By the early 1970s, the United States was home to 1,000 Clubs serving 1 million children. In 1980, the organization dropped the apostrophe from its name to become Boys Clubs of America. However, this name was short-lived.

Starting in the 1950s, Clubs nationwide had also started welcoming many female participants, a fact that wasn’t reflected in the “Boys’ Club” moniker. To recognize that girls were a welcome part of the organization, its leaders launched an effort to change its name in the late 1980s. In September 1990, the national organization’s name was officially changed to Boys and Girls Clubs of America.

 

Boys and Girls Clubs Today

Throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, membership in Boys and Girls Clubs of America continued to grow. By the time BGCA celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2006, approximately 2,000 local Clubs were helping over 2.5 million children and teens. Today, BGCA membership sits at over 4.7 million youth at more than 4,600 Club facilities.

In recent years, BGCA has focused on expanding the reach and scope of its programs. There are now over 1,000 Clubs in rural areas and nearly 500 BGCA-affiliated youth facilities on military installations around the globe. Additionally, there are more than 300 Clubs in public housing areas and nearly 200 Clubs on native lands.

From the earliest days of the organization, the programming at BGCA has sought to build good character and leadership while promoting healthy lifestyles and academic success. While the focus remains the same today, the group’s Academic Success Programs have changed somewhat in recent years to emphasize 21st-century skills. Members across all Clubs now take part in a variety of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) activities via programs such as Computer Science Pathway, DIY STEM, and Tech Girls Rock.

This type of programming now plays a key role in ensuring that BGCA can fulfill its mission and vision in order to help young people reach their full potential and find success as responsible, caring, and productive citizens. More information about BGCA’s history and its current programs is available at www.bgca.org.

 

Disclaimer: This website contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. This information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy or validity of any statements or information provided on this website. Do not rely on this information as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or another professional healthcare provider. You should seek immediate medical attention if you think you are suffering from a medical condition. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website.

woman

Military Service Groups Receive Boost from Wounded Warrior Project

wounded warrior projectWounded Warrior Project (WWP) has been busy recently advancing its various initiatives in support of military veterans and their families. Across the country, local WWP events and activities have provided opportunities for members to socialize and learn more about the many ways that they can benefit from veterans’ programs and services.

WWP has also been working nationally to promote its own activities while supporting those of other organizations. Recently, Wounded Warrior announced its latest investments and partnerships with nearly two dozen veteran and military service groups. These organizations will receive a combined $6.9 million from WWP, which has provided over $88 million to 165 organizations over the last decade. Keep reading for a closer look at a few of WWP’s 2019 community partners.

 

Veterans of Foreign Wars

With a history dating back to 1899, Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) has been supporting veterans, service members, and their families for well over a century. Over the years, the group has played a major role in helping to establish many of the programs that are available to retired and active-duty military personnel.

Today, VFW’s various programs help veterans of every generation to file VA claims and access mental-wellness support services. The organization also offers scholarships for post-secondary studies and financial grants for military families in need. In recent years, VFW has distributed nearly $20 million in scholarships and other financial assistance.

 

Warrior Reunion Foundation

A group recently founded by two Marine combat veterans, the Warrior Reunion Foundation has been operating since 2017. As its name suggests, the focus of the organization is on reuniting veterans and active military members who served with one another in combat. Since its inception, the group has organized several military reunions and reunited more than 300 combat veterans.

The Warrior Reunion Foundation’s programs help military members to reconnect and build support networks comprised of individuals with similar shared experiences. With the support of individual donors and groups such as WWP, the Warrior Reunion Foundation is able to continue to expand its work.

 

Homes for Our Troops

For the last 15 years, Homes for Our Troops has been building and donating specially adapted custom homes for post-9/11 veterans who have been severely injured in combat. The organization also continues to support the veterans that it serves after their homes are completed by providing pro bono financial planning assistance, home ownership education, and warranty coverage. Additionally, the group works with other nonprofits, as well as corporations and government entities, to ensure that each veteran has access to the assistance that they need.

Since its founding in 2004, Homes for Our Troops has built more than 270 specially adapted homes across the country. The group’s work has earned it recognition as a top-rated military charity with Charity Navigator, Charity Watch, and GuideStar. Currently, Homes for Our Troops is overseeing home-building projects in several states.

 

Hiring Our Heroes

Hiring Our Heroes is a US Chamber of Commerce Foundation initiative that launched in 2011. The initiative leverages the support of local chambers of commerce, as well as various strategic partners, to ensure that veterans, active service members, and military spouses have access to meaningful employment opportunities in their communities.

A regular participant in job fairs and other events nationwide, Hiring Our Heroes offers a free suite of digital tools. These tools include online resume builders and resources to help veterans transition from military to civilian careers. Over the years, the Hiring Our Heroes initiative has helped hundreds of thousands of veterans and military spouses to obtain employment.

 

Elizabeth Dole Foundation

The United States is home to more than 5.5 million military caregivers, including spouses, parents, children, and friends who are committed to supporting veterans with physical and/or behavioral health issues. To ensure that these men and women have access to their own support services, the Elizabeth Dole Foundation promotes public policy, advances research, and leads collaborative efforts to recognize the work of military caregivers and promote their well-being.

Some of the Elizabeth Dole Foundation’s current programs and activities include the Campaign for Inclusive Care, which seeks to improve communication and collaboration between veterans’ health care teams and their caregivers. Wounded Warrior Project is a coalition partner supporting these efforts. WWP is also helping to fund research by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation to examine the needs of children of military caregivers.

 

WWP’s Other 2019 Partners

In addition to these five organizations, WWP is working with several other groups on single or multi-year partnerships throughout 2019. They include the following: Center for a New American Security; Vets’ Community Connections; America’s Warrior Partnership; Team Red, White and Blue; HillVets; and the National Military Family Association.

WWP’s work with these groups will help to raise awareness about the issues that the nation’s veterans face and ensure that they have access to programs, tools, and other resources to support their physical and behavioral health and overall well-being.

 

Disclaimer: This website contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. This information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy or validity of any statements or information provided on this website. Do not rely on this information as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or another professional healthcare provider. You should seek immediate medical attention if you think you are suffering from a medical condition. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website.