Three Tips for Cooking Better Chili

Chili pic

Chili
Image: allrecipes.com

Since April 2016, Dr. Erol Onel has served as the vice president of Heron Therapeutics in La Jolla, California. There, he provides scientific leadership in various therapeutic areas while working with a team to get a new non-opioid drug approved. Outside of the office, Dr. Erol Onel loves to cook and, along with his wife, has won a cooking competition with his chili.

A good chili is a hearty, flavorful, and welcoming meal, especially in colder weather. These three tips will help make your next chili dish the best you have ever made.

1. Beans – When choosing between dried beans and canned, go for dried beans. They hold together better in the cooking process, where canned beans often turn to mush. Soak the dry beans overnight before cooking them in salted water, which will help keep the skin intact.

2. Blooming Spices – Whether you are using your own blend of chili powder or a store-bought variety, bloom it first to release its flavor and intensify the spices present. Blooming your spices simply entails cooking them in a pan with a bit of oil or butter.

3. Low and Slow – While you could follow a recipe promising quick and easy chili, it will not provide as rich a taste as slow-cooked chili. Instead of rushing, give your chili a couple of hours to simmer over low heat, which will allow your dish to draw out its most complex flavors.

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Society for the Study of Male Reproduction – Membership Levels

Society for the Study of Male Reproductionpic

Society for the Study of Male Reproduction
Image: ssmr.org

Dr. Erol Onel holds a doctor of medicine from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and oversees non-opioid drug approval proceedings as the vice president of Heron Therapeutics in California. An experienced physician with a background in urology, Dr. Erol Onel belongs to the Society for the Study of Male Reproduction (SSMR). Membership with the organization unites individuals with an interest in male reproductive health and contributes to improved quality of care.

SSMR encourages ongoing studies of the male reproductive system and provides accurate, credible information to help medical professionals improve patient care and strengthen their practices. Members receive updates regarding existing and emerging issues on male reproductive health through access to a range of media, such as conference reports and proposed policies. They also engage in the development of standards and participate in continuing medical education conferences.

Membership with the SSMR falls into the three general categories of Active, Student, and Senior/Honorary. Active members include individuals who meet a series of SSMR criteria, such as clinical training in male reproductive medicine or regular attendance to SSMR events. Resident, fellow, and postdoctoral students may also apply for membership, although they hold no voting rights and must provide proof of current training status. Senior or Honorary memberships are also available to SSMR members who are disabled or elderly and have at least 10 years of affiliation background with the organization.

Goodwill Wins Award for Its Executive Development Program

 

Goodwill
Image: goodwill.org

A former assistant professor of urology at Tufts University and Medical Center, Dr. Erol Onel now serves as vice president of Heron Therapeutics, Inc., in La Jolla, California. In addition to his work, Dr. Erol Onel supports a number of charities and other organizations that make a positive impact in communities, including Goodwill Industries.

Last August, Goodwill Industries announced that it has been selected as one of the 2017 recipients of the prestigious Power of A Silver Award, which is given by the American Society of Association Executives to organizations that have demonstrated superior contributions to society. Goodwill was specifically recognized for its Executive Development Program (EDP), which helps train individuals in the skills they need to succeed as Goodwill CEOs in their particular territories.

In his comments, the president of Goodwill Industries International Jim Gibbons said the EDP program is one of the organization’s most important initiatives because it trains leaders who work directly with community individuals in need. He then recognized the program’s participants for their work in helping the organization receive the award.

Goodwill’s History of Community-Building Work

Goodwill
Image: goodwill.org

Erol Onel, MD, has built up a distinguished career in the fields of urology, andrology, reproductive health, and pharmaceutical clinical development. Currently a vice president of Heron Therapeutics, Inc., Dr. Erol Onel is also devoted to philanthropy, making regular contributions to humanitarian organizations such as Goodwill Industries International, Inc.

Goodwill manages storefronts and donation centers familiar in most larger communities across the United States. The group translates supporters’ donations into helping individuals, families, and communities to improve their circumstances. It provided job skills training, career support, and other assistance to more than 300,000 people in one recent year alone.

But far fewer people today know Goodwill’s history.

At the turn of the 20th century, Dr. Edgar Helms set out to assist individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds and people with disabilities to fulfill their potential as skilled employees and providers for their families. The Methodist minister and social reformer worked in Boston’s South End. He decided that the best way to help the people of the neighborhood to help themselves was to offer them a means of working with dignity.

So, in 1902, he founded Goodwill, through which people from disadvantaged backgrounds repaired donated clothing, then sold it at prices affordable to others of limited means. While today’s Goodwill employees no longer repair the used items they sell, the basic model of offering both employment and a means of obtaining necessities for only a nominal charge remains, with everyone involved benefiting from the transaction.